Motion Pictures at a Revolution

Snarkoleptic. Thief of joy. Crusher of dreams. Holder of grudges . Haver of opinions. Passionate cineaste. Amateur critic. Professional snob.

Feel free to ask me anything.
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Round up the Usual Suspects

3 Women (1977)

(via juvenile-cinephile)

Her (2013)

(via juvenile-cinephile)

fuckyeahdirectors:

Julia Roberts and Steven Soderbergh on-set of Erin Brokovich (2000)

(via juvenile-cinephile)

thomeyorker:

David Lynch around 1966, when he was an art student at the PAFA

(via juvenile-cinephile)

tylekurner:

At age 45, it feels like writer-director Noah Baumbach is getting soft. Best known for his caustic tragicomedies like Kicking and ScreamingThe Squid and the WhaleGreenberg, and Margot at the Wedding, he took a turn in tone for his 2012 feature Frances Ha, which starred and was co-written by Greta Gerwig. So, though the warmth of that film might surprise someone familiar with his work, that it’s a collaboration with Gerwig explains at least part of that tone. While We’re Young, though, Baumbach’s newest film which premiered at TIFF this year and made a surprise appearance at the New York Film Festival, manages to carry that affection. It’s hard to top Frances Ha, but his newest is pleasant and impressive all the same.

[…]

- NYFF2014: The Young and the Old and the Restless - While We’re Young // Sound on Sight

Punch-Drunk Love (2002)

(via juvenile-cinephile)

It’s 100% a love story. The best love stories are the ones where they don’t end up together. We very deliberately tried to make it like a love story. She has girl, she loses girl, she tries to win girl back. Just trying to make it feel like it was existing within the tropes of a romantic love story, then letting the reins go. It’s sad. That’s my favorite feeling in movies, that ache.

Greta Gerwig, on Frances/Sophie’s relationship

(via juvenile-cinephile)

cinyma:

When you think about it, Mr. Kane, the competence of totalitarian nations is much higher than ours. They get things done.

Saboteur (1942), Alfred Hitchcock

(via juvenile-cinephile)

Steve McQueen - Deadpan (1997)
Turner Prize-winning artist Steve McQueen—now best known for his feature films, Hunger, Shame, and 12 Years a Slave—put himself in the line of fire in Deadpan (1997), a restaging of Buster Keaton’s falling house gag from Steamboat Bill Jr. McQueen does more than remake the stunt; his presence as a black man transforms the work into a commentary on race relations and the precariousness of the black experience. 

"Damage Control: How Artists Destroy to Create Art"

(via juvenile-cinephile)